ACE Open_IntoMyArms Performances_May12 2018_150_LoRes.jpg
ACE Open_IntoMyArms Performances_May12 2018_054_LoRes.jpg
ACE Open_IntoMyArms Performances_May12 2018_058_LoRes.jpg
  (again, back            remain through , performed with Virginia Barratt, commissioned performance for Into My Arms co-curated by Frances Barratt and Toby Chapman, Ace Open. Photography by Sam Roberts.   -  The prefix ‘re-’ originates from the Latin,  again, back .   Back, again? Re-iterate, reticence, re-perform.  Parentheses ( put in beside ) are used to hold apart language as an aside. Often an aside that the writer wants the reader to  see  but not to  hear .  To look but not to hold?   (again, back remain through   is a performance that embraces the site of Ace Open, its memory of experimental performance art, and my time in the space. It takes cues from how I am situated in labour, discourse and as a politicised body.  The work negotiates the performative, reiterative function of language to consider the structural conditions of an embrace and undertakes acts of translation from one form into another—written, vocalised, inscribed—and thus from one time, body and space into another to ask how can an embrace be performed in a body and in language. It asks what is lost, what remains and what’s reoriented when language is carried into different contexts.

(again, back            remain through, performed with Virginia Barratt, commissioned performance for Into My Arms co-curated by Frances Barratt and Toby Chapman, Ace Open. Photography by Sam Roberts. 

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The prefix ‘re-’ originates from the Latin, again, back.

 Back, again? Re-iterate, reticence, re-perform.

Parentheses (put in beside) are used to hold apart language as an aside. Often an aside that the writer wants the reader to see but not to hear.  To look but not to hold?

(again, back remain through  is a performance that embraces the site of Ace Open, its memory of experimental performance art, and my time in the space. It takes cues from how I am situated in labour, discourse and as a politicised body.

The work negotiates the performative, reiterative function of language to consider the structural conditions of an embrace and undertakes acts of translation from one form into another—written, vocalised, inscribed—and thus from one time, body and space into another to ask how can an embrace be performed in a body and in language. It asks what is lost, what remains and what’s reoriented when language is carried into different contexts.